Wedge-Tight Wooden Bench

This is a wooden bench which was designed, modeled, and fabricated using digital manufacturing technologies. /// The “Wedge-Tight” Bench was designed and built over the 2015-2016 school year at Laney College in Oakland, CA. /// Design Challenge: To design a seat using a sheet of 3/4 inch plywood (4x8ft) that can be cut on the CNC router and requires no external fasteners or hardware (including glue and screws).  /// Interpretation: I designed this bench to fit in my front hallway and to be used by guests to remove and stow shoes when entering.  In order to ensure long term durability without the use of fasteners the bench uses interlocking pieces with keyed mortise and tenon joints.  The "keys" are little wedge shaped pieces of plywood that are hammered into the tenons to prevent them from pulling out. /// Process:  I initially designed the bench in Sketch-up during the Machine Tech. Spatial Reasoning class in fall 2015.  Both a fully assembled model and one with all the parts laid out flat (for cutting) were made.  In spring 2016 I was able to take the design off the computer and into real life during the Carpentry Digital Manufacturing.  The first physical incarnation was a ~1/6th scale model using 1/8" MDF board cut on the laser cutter.  After the model was successfully assembled I turned to the full size version.  I imported the model into Fusion 360 to model the tool paths for the CNC router.  After many hours of adjusting the final geometries the final program used 8 operations to cut all the outlines, holes, and rabbets.  The cutting took a few hours of machine time and lots of hand sanding.  After it was sanded and dry fit I added a dark stain to the wedge keys to add contrast to highlight their function.  Finally the bench was coated with polyurethane to ensure a lifetime of service.  The bench is very solid and lives in my front hallway.
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  • Acee673dc2a8888c49ff919a5f44dac4
    This is a wooden bench which was designed, modeled, and fabricated using digital manufacturing technologies. /// The “Wedge-Tight” Bench was designed and built over the 2015-2016 school year at Laney College in Oakland, CA. /// Design Challenge: To design a seat using a sheet of 3/4 inch plywood (4x8ft) that can be cut on the CNC router and requires no external fasteners or hardware (including glue and screws).  /// Interpretation: I designed this bench to fit in my front hallway and to be used by guests to remove and stow shoes when entering.  In order to ensure long term durability without the use of fasteners the bench uses interlocking pieces with keyed mortise and tenon joints.  The "keys" are little wedge shaped pieces of plywood that are hammered into the tenons to prevent them from pulling out. /// Process:  I initially designed the bench in Sketch-up during the Machine Tech. Spatial Reasoning class in fall 2015.  Both a fully assembled model and one with all the parts laid out flat (for cutting) were made.  In spring 2016 I was able to take the design off the computer and into real life during the Carpentry Digital Manufacturing.  The first physical incarnation was a ~1/6th scale model using 1/8" MDF board cut on the laser cutter.  After the model was successfully assembled I turned to the full size version.  I imported the model into Fusion 360 to model the tool paths for the CNC router.  After many hours of adjusting the final geometries the final program used 8 operations to cut all the outlines, holes, and rabbets.  The cutting took a few hours of machine time and lots of hand sanding.  After it was sanded and dry fit I added a dark stain to the wedge keys to add contrast to highlight their function.  Finally the bench was coated with polyurethane to ensure a lifetime of service.  The bench is very solid and lives in my front hallway.
  • 80326de7fe8b569fdfdba3894aa1f80a
    This is a wooden bench which was designed, modeled, and fabricated using digital manufacturing technologies. /// The “Wedge-Tight” Bench was designed and built over the 2015-2016 school year at Laney College in Oakland, CA. /// Design Challenge: To design a seat using a sheet of 3/4 inch plywood (4x8ft) that can be cut on the CNC router and requires no external fasteners or hardware (including glue and screws).  /// Interpretation: I designed this bench to fit in my front hallway and to be used by guests to remove and stow shoes when entering.  In order to ensure long term durability without the use of fasteners the bench uses interlocking pieces with keyed mortise and tenon joints.  The "keys" are little wedge shaped pieces of plywood that are hammered into the tenons to prevent them from pulling out. /// Process:  I initially designed the bench in Sketch-up during the Machine Tech. Spatial Reasoning class in fall 2015.  Both a fully assembled model and one with all the parts laid out flat (for cutting) were made.  In spring 2016 I was able to take the design off the computer and into real life during the Carpentry Digital Manufacturing.  The first physical incarnation was a ~1/6th scale model using 1/8" MDF board cut on the laser cutter.  After the model was successfully assembled I turned to the full size version.  I imported the model into Fusion 360 to model the tool paths for the CNC router.  After many hours of adjusting the final geometries the final program used 8 operations to cut all the outlines, holes, and rabbets.  The cutting took a few hours of machine time and lots of hand sanding.  After it was sanded and dry fit I added a dark stain to the wedge keys to add contrast to highlight their function.  Finally the bench was coated with polyurethane to ensure a lifetime of service.  The bench is very solid and lives in my front hallway.
  • 9502e952867c76cbe3e4800638cffda2
    This is a wooden bench which was designed, modeled, and fabricated using digital manufacturing technologies. /// The “Wedge-Tight” Bench was designed and built over the 2015-2016 school year at Laney College in Oakland, CA. /// Design Challenge: To design a seat using a sheet of 3/4 inch plywood (4x8ft) that can be cut on the CNC router and requires no external fasteners or hardware (including glue and screws).  /// Interpretation: I designed this bench to fit in my front hallway and to be used by guests to remove and stow shoes when entering.  In order to ensure long term durability without the use of fasteners the bench uses interlocking pieces with keyed mortise and tenon joints.  The "keys" are little wedge shaped pieces of plywood that are hammered into the tenons to prevent them from pulling out. /// Process:  I initially designed the bench in Sketch-up during the Machine Tech. Spatial Reasoning class in fall 2015.  Both a fully assembled model and one with all the parts laid out flat (for cutting) were made.  In spring 2016 I was able to take the design off the computer and into real life during the Carpentry Digital Manufacturing.  The first physical incarnation was a ~1/6th scale model using 1/8" MDF board cut on the laser cutter.  After the model was successfully assembled I turned to the full size version.  I imported the model into Fusion 360 to model the tool paths for the CNC router.  After many hours of adjusting the final geometries the final program used 8 operations to cut all the outlines, holes, and rabbets.  The cutting took a few hours of machine time and lots of hand sanding.  After it was sanded and dry fit I added a dark stain to the wedge keys to add contrast to highlight their function.  Finally the bench was coated with polyurethane to ensure a lifetime of service.  The bench is very solid and lives in my front hallway.
  • 4fd07129bcbded05e7416a3d126fa8c4
    This is a wooden bench which was designed, modeled, and fabricated using digital manufacturing technologies. /// The “Wedge-Tight” Bench was designed and built over the 2015-2016 school year at Laney College in Oakland, CA. /// Design Challenge: To design a seat using a sheet of 3/4 inch plywood (4x8ft) that can be cut on the CNC router and requires no external fasteners or hardware (including glue and screws).  /// Interpretation: I designed this bench to fit in my front hallway and to be used by guests to remove and stow shoes when entering.  In order to ensure long term durability without the use of fasteners the bench uses interlocking pieces with keyed mortise and tenon joints.  The "keys" are little wedge shaped pieces of plywood that are hammered into the tenons to prevent them from pulling out. /// Process:  I initially designed the bench in Sketch-up during the Machine Tech. Spatial Reasoning class in fall 2015.  Both a fully assembled model and one with all the parts laid out flat (for cutting) were made.  In spring 2016 I was able to take the design off the computer and into real life during the Carpentry Digital Manufacturing.  The first physical incarnation was a ~1/6th scale model using 1/8" MDF board cut on the laser cutter.  After the model was successfully assembled I turned to the full size version.  I imported the model into Fusion 360 to model the tool paths for the CNC router.  After many hours of adjusting the final geometries the final program used 8 operations to cut all the outlines, holes, and rabbets.  The cutting took a few hours of machine time and lots of hand sanding.  After it was sanded and dry fit I added a dark stain to the wedge keys to add contrast to highlight their function.  Finally the bench was coated with polyurethane to ensure a lifetime of service.  The bench is very solid and lives in my front hallway.
  • 1773fb0b01aa433dfc1a5b9c8e5f2040
    This is a wooden bench which was designed, modeled, and fabricated using digital manufacturing technologies. /// The “Wedge-Tight” Bench was designed and built over the 2015-2016 school year at Laney College in Oakland, CA. /// Design Challenge: To design a seat using a sheet of 3/4 inch plywood (4x8ft) that can be cut on the CNC router and requires no external fasteners or hardware (including glue and screws).  /// Interpretation: I designed this bench to fit in my front hallway and to be used by guests to remove and stow shoes when entering.  In order to ensure long term durability without the use of fasteners the bench uses interlocking pieces with keyed mortise and tenon joints.  The "keys" are little wedge shaped pieces of plywood that are hammered into the tenons to prevent them from pulling out. /// Process:  I initially designed the bench in Sketch-up during the Machine Tech. Spatial Reasoning class in fall 2015.  Both a fully assembled model and one with all the parts laid out flat (for cutting) were made.  In spring 2016 I was able to take the design off the computer and into real life during the Carpentry Digital Manufacturing.  The first physical incarnation was a ~1/6th scale model using 1/8" MDF board cut on the laser cutter.  After the model was successfully assembled I turned to the full size version.  I imported the model into Fusion 360 to model the tool paths for the CNC router.  After many hours of adjusting the final geometries the final program used 8 operations to cut all the outlines, holes, and rabbets.  The cutting took a few hours of machine time and lots of hand sanding.  After it was sanded and dry fit I added a dark stain to the wedge keys to add contrast to highlight their function.  Finally the bench was coated with polyurethane to ensure a lifetime of service.  The bench is very solid and lives in my front hallway.
  • 4e15bcb270144e165c35806873dd95f9
    This is a wooden bench which was designed, modeled, and fabricated using digital manufacturing technologies. /// The “Wedge-Tight” Bench was designed and built over the 2015-2016 school year at Laney College in Oakland, CA. /// Design Challenge: To design a seat using a sheet of 3/4 inch plywood (4x8ft) that can be cut on the CNC router and requires no external fasteners or hardware (including glue and screws).  /// Interpretation: I designed this bench to fit in my front hallway and to be used by guests to remove and stow shoes when entering.  In order to ensure long term durability without the use of fasteners the bench uses interlocking pieces with keyed mortise and tenon joints.  The "keys" are little wedge shaped pieces of plywood that are hammered into the tenons to prevent them from pulling out. /// Process:  I initially designed the bench in Sketch-up during the Machine Tech. Spatial Reasoning class in fall 2015.  Both a fully assembled model and one with all the parts laid out flat (for cutting) were made.  In spring 2016 I was able to take the design off the computer and into real life during the Carpentry Digital Manufacturing.  The first physical incarnation was a ~1/6th scale model using 1/8" MDF board cut on the laser cutter.  After the model was successfully assembled I turned to the full size version.  I imported the model into Fusion 360 to model the tool paths for the CNC router.  After many hours of adjusting the final geometries the final program used 8 operations to cut all the outlines, holes, and rabbets.  The cutting took a few hours of machine time and lots of hand sanding.  After it was sanded and dry fit I added a dark stain to the wedge keys to add contrast to highlight their function.  Finally the bench was coated with polyurethane to ensure a lifetime of service.  The bench is very solid and lives in my front hallway.
  • D83c1a277e1a4b4c513cc6489e037984
    This is a wooden bench which was designed, modeled, and fabricated using digital manufacturing technologies. /// The “Wedge-Tight” Bench was designed and built over the 2015-2016 school year at Laney College in Oakland, CA. /// Design Challenge: To design a seat using a sheet of 3/4 inch plywood (4x8ft) that can be cut on the CNC router and requires no external fasteners or hardware (including glue and screws).  /// Interpretation: I designed this bench to fit in my front hallway and to be used by guests to remove and stow shoes when entering.  In order to ensure long term durability without the use of fasteners the bench uses interlocking pieces with keyed mortise and tenon joints.  The "keys" are little wedge shaped pieces of plywood that are hammered into the tenons to prevent them from pulling out. /// Process:  I initially designed the bench in Sketch-up during the Machine Tech. Spatial Reasoning class in fall 2015.  Both a fully assembled model and one with all the parts laid out flat (for cutting) were made.  In spring 2016 I was able to take the design off the computer and into real life during the Carpentry Digital Manufacturing.  The first physical incarnation was a ~1/6th scale model using 1/8" MDF board cut on the laser cutter.  After the model was successfully assembled I turned to the full size version.  I imported the model into Fusion 360 to model the tool paths for the CNC router.  After many hours of adjusting the final geometries the final program used 8 operations to cut all the outlines, holes, and rabbets.  The cutting took a few hours of machine time and lots of hand sanding.  After it was sanded and dry fit I added a dark stain to the wedge keys to add contrast to highlight their function.  Finally the bench was coated with polyurethane to ensure a lifetime of service.  The bench is very solid and lives in my front hallway.